Pride Overcomes Prejudice

Pride Overcomes Prejudice

$ 45.00

Hard Cover

Edited by Dr. Andrea Douglas
Essays by Scot French, exhibition curator and associate professor of history at the University of Central Florida, Paul Gaston professor emeritus, Corcoran Department of History, UVA, Patrice Grimes, associate professor in the University of Virginia's Curry School of Education, and Lauranett Lee, curator of African American History at the Virginia Historical Society.

Opened in 1865 as a Freedmen's school, the Jefferson School endured in Charlottesville as the only school for African Americans until 1951, when Jackson P. Burley High School was built. Pride Overcomes Prejudice, the companion to the permanent exhibition of the same title, chronicles the school's rich history in four essays written by Scot French, exhibition curator and associate professor of history at the University of Central Florida, Paul Gaston professor emeritus, Corcoran Department of History, UVA, Patrice Preston-Grimes, associate professor in the University of Virginia's Curry School of Education, and Lauranett Lee, curator of African American History at the Virginia Historical Society. The historical arc described by these authors reveals the resilience and resolve of Charlottesville's African American community to pursue education despite diminishing numbers, loss of property and legislation that controlled their inhabitance of public spaces. What is clear from these essays is that African Americans were deeply engaged in the political process that determined access to education from Reconstruction to the end of the 20th century. In the case of Charlottesville, their efforts meant pushing back against a system where separate was anything but equal.